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    Asthma
    1234 · 20 min read

    What is COPD in medical terms?

    In this article, we will explore COPD. We'll explain what COPD stands for, what it actually is in medical terms, and talk about the common signs you might notice if you have it. Plus, we'll cover the different treatments available to help manage COPD.

    Doctor holding a set of holographic lungs in their hands to indicate COPD

    What is COPD short for?

    COPD is an abbreviation for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. According to the World Health Organisation, this term covers a range of lung diseases, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The name "Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease" breaks down the key aspects of this condition. "Chronic" signifies that COPD is a long-term and persistent issue, not a short-lived condition. "Obstructive" highlights a significant characteristic of the disease, where the airways become partially blocked. "Pulmonary" references the lungs, emphasising that COPD primarily affects the respiratory system, and “Disease” shows that it is a medical condition with symptoms, causes, and treatments.

    What is COPD in medical terms?

    In medical terms, COPD stands for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. This covers a group of long-term lung conditions that obstruct the airflow and make it difficult to breathe. According to the NHS, the two main conditions within COPD are chronic bronchitis, involving long-term inflammation of the airways, and emphysema, characterised by damage to the air sacs in the lungs.

    What are the common symptoms of COPD?

    As with other medical conditions, COPD has a number of common symptoms. The most common of these, according to Asthma + Lung UK, include:

    • Shortness of Breath

    Individuals with COPD often find themselves getting short of breath easily, even during routine activities like taking a walk or doing household chores.

    • Persistent Cough

    A prolonged and lingering cough is a common symptom of COPD. This isn't just a temporary cough but one that lasts over an extended period.

    • Wheezing

    Wheezing, characterised by a high-pitched whistling sound while breathing, is another typical symptom of COPD. It occurs due to the narrowed airways.

    • Increased Phlegm Production

    COPD can lead to the production of more phlegm or mucus than usual. This can result in frequent coughing up of phlegm, indicating irritation and inflammation in the airways.

    What causes COPD?

    According to the HSE, the primary cause of COPD is cigarette smoking, a well-known contributor to the development of this chronic lung condition. However, it's crucial to note that exposure to dust and fumes in the workplace can also lead to COPD, even in individuals who do not smoke. Occupations where COPD is most common include those with heightened exposure to dust, fumes, and irritating gases. The risk is significantly increased if individuals both breathe in these substances at work and smoke.

    Can COPD be cured?

    Unfortunately, according to the UK Parliament, there is currently no cure for COPD. However, effective treatment can play a crucial role in slowing down its progression and managing the associated symptoms. This means that individuals diagnosed with COPD can still lead fulfilling lives with the right treatment plan in place.

    What treatment options are available for COPD?

    A number of different treatment options are available for people suffering from COPD. You should discuss with your doctor what treatment might be best for you. According to the NHS, treatments include:

    • Stopping smoking: If you have COPD and smoke, quitting is very important. It stands as the most crucial step in managing the condition and slowing its progression.

    • Inhalers and Tablets: Medications in the form of inhalers and tablets are commonly prescribed to ease breathing difficulties. Inhalers, in particular, deliver medication directly to the lungs, providing quick relief.

    • Pulmonary Rehabilitation: This is a specialised program involving both exercise and education. It aims to enhance your understanding of COPD and improve your physical condition through tailored exercises.

    • Surgery or Lung Transplant: While not applicable to everyone, a small number of individuals may be considered for surgical interventions or lung transplants in severe cases.

    Which COPD treatments are available at UK Meds?

    At UK Meds, we have a number of different treatments for both COPD and asthma available to purchase online. We have well-known medications including inhalers like Ventolin (Salbutamol)Salamol (Salamol Inhalers)Clenil Modulite, and Fostair, as well as many more. You are also able to purchase a number of asthma and COPD medications from UK Meds on a subscription basis which is very convenient and cost effective.

    Sources

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    Related Products

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    • Helps to relieve symptoms
    • Suitable for asthma and COPD
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    Blog author

    Scott Weaver

    Scott is an experienced and professional content writer who works exclusively for UK Meds.

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